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Catherine Anderson, PhD

Full Member of ARiEAL


Teaching Professor, Department of Linguistics and Languages, McMaster University 

Togo Salmon Hall, Room 503, McMaster University
1280 Main Street West

Email: canders@mcmaster.ca

Office Phone: (905) 525-9140 x26241

Websites: 

 

Dr. Catherine Anderson is a teaching professor in the Department of Linguistics & Languages. In her current research she collaborates with student partners to investigate the student experience in active, team-based learning and in blended learning, as well as student uptake of Open Access learning resources.



Representative Publications

McKenny, P., & Anderson, C. (2019). Quality with integrity: Working in partnership to conduct a program review. International Journal for Students as Partners, 3(2), 27–43. https://doi.org/10.15173/ijsap.v3i2.3757

Anderson, C. (2018). Essentials of Linguistics. https://essentialsoflinguistics.pressbooks.com

Miller-Young, J. E., Anderson, C., Kiceniuk, D., Mooney, J., Riddell, J., Schmidt Hanbidge, A., … Chick, N. (2017). Leading Up in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 8(2), Article 4. https://doi.org/10.5206/cjsotl-rcacea.2017.2.4

Anderson, C. (2017). Checklists: A Simple Tool to Help Students Stay Organized and Motivated. College Teaching, 65(4), 209–210. https://doi.org/10.1080/87567555.2016.1245648

den Ouden, D.-B., Dickey, M. W., Anderson, C., & Christianson, K. (2016). Neural correlates of early-closure garden-path processing: Effects of prosody and plausibility. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69(5), 926–949. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2015.1028416

Anderson, C. (2016). Learning to think like linguists: A think-aloud study of novice phonology students. Language, 92(4), e274–e29. https://doi.org/10.1353/lan.2016.0081

Anderson, C., & Carlson, K. (2010). Syntactic structure guides prosody in temporarily ambiguous sentences. Language and Speech, 53(4), 445–466.